Baby Feeding – Feeding Your Baby Healthy Foods For a Good Start

Knowing what to feed your baby in the early stages is a little easier because she will be on liquid diet of breast milk or formula (preferably breast milk when possible). But what happens when it’s time to start introducing soft solid foods? Your pediatrician will help guide you on when to start introducing solids but generally the main diet for babies up to six months should be breast milk or formula.

When you start introducing solid foods it should be foods like soft cereals — rice, barley or oat — and pureed or mashed fruits and vegetables. Watch baby to make sure there isn’t a reaction to the new foods and note anything you notice. Fruits that are good starters include bananas, applesauce, avocado, peaches, mango and plum to name a few. Vegetables that are good starters include sweet potato, pumpkin, carrots and peas to name a few. The fruit should be mashed and pureed and the vegetables should all be cooked, mashed and pureed.

Many are finding that homemade baby food is cheaper and many feel healthier than commercial baby food. Homemade baby food is fresher and you have complete control of the ingredients so you know exactly what’s in the food; there aren’t any fillers just nutritious food.

Don’t panic, making baby food isn’t that difficult. Choose the foods you want to make, cook those foods until they are somewhat soft, let them cool, then put them in food processor or blender and puree. You can also use an immersion blender to puree the foods to make it that much easier. You can use water, breast milk or formula to mix the puree if needed.

Baby feeding with homemade foods can be a lot of fun as you create combinations and start learning your baby’s likes and dislikes. It also feels better feeding your baby something you made instead of something that came in a jar. It’s easy to freeze and store so you can have food on hand and ready at any time.

Baby feeding is an important part of your baby’s first years. After all baby is quickly growing and developing, needing nutrient rich foods to help the little system become it’s best. You don’t want to feed empty calories. Everything baby eats should have nutritional value.

Tips For Keeping Your Baby Healthy and Safe

Here are some key points to remember to help keep your baby healthy and safe. Remember, newborns, preemies, and young infants are very susceptible to illness. Be sure to:

* Wash your hands frequently when caring for your little one (especially after going to the bathroom and changing diapers).
* Make sure all visitors wash their hands prior to touching your baby.
* Make sure visitors are not ill when coming to visit.
* Avoid large crowds for at least 1 month after your baby is born.

Help protected your baby from accidental injury. Be sure to:

* Always place your baby in an appropriate car seat when traveling in any vehicle.
* Never leave baby unattended (especially in the car, bathtub, changing table, or on any other elevated area).
* Always keep one hand on your baby when in the bathtub, on the changing table, or on any elevated area.
* Never shake your baby. Shaken baby syndrome can cause blindness, brain damage or death.
* Place baby on his/her back to sleep to reduce the likelihood of sudden infant death syndrome.
* Always test the temperature of the water before giving a bath.
* Use a non-skid mat in the bathtub.
* Never prop a bottle when feeding your baby.
* Never place pacifier on a string around baby’s neck.
* Check pacifiers and nipples for holes and tears frequently.
* Always test the temperature of breast milk/formula prior to feeding your baby.
* Never leave pets or young children alone with your baby.
* Ensure smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors are functioning properly.
* Do not carry infant when you are cooking or holding hot drinks.
* Make sure that your baby’s toys are unbreakable.
* Remove toys from the crib when your baby is sleeping or unattended.
* Never give an infant under 1 year of age honey. Honey has been associated with botulism.

Helping Infants Avoid Flu – 5 Ways to Help Keep Your Baby Healthy During Flu Season

The flu vaccine is a great preventive step for those who are 6 months and older. But if your baby is less than 6 months, you will need to think outside the box for some alternatives for keeping your child healthy this flu season. Here are 5 effective ways to increase your child’s chances of staying healthy.

Get Your Family Vaccinated – If you have other children, who are older, make sure that they receive the vaccine early. Parents should receive the shot, as well as any caregivers, grandparents, or others who see your child frequently. This makes them less of a risk now and as the season reaches its typical peak during January and February.

Isolate Those Who Are Ill – If someone in your family should catch a cold or even the flu; make sure the baby is kept away from them. This is particularly true with younger siblings who may not yet be able to consistently practice good hygiene such as covering their mouths when they sneeze or cough.

If you are caring for both the sick child and the baby, be certain to wash your hands frequently, and disinfect common surfaces to help deter its spread.

Wear a Mask – Should the main caregiver start to show signs of being contagious, hand off close contact, and regular daily chores such as diaper changes, and feeding to the other parent, grandparent, or someone the child knows who is well. And since, depending on the age of the child, they may not understand why you are not around as much; wear a mask when in close contact with the baby.

Get Treated Early – If you suspect that you are catching the flu, or that it’s catching up to you, go for early treatment. Blood work can confirm whether you have it, and an antiviral medication can be prescribed. If administered within 48 hours of the start of the infection, it can often greatly reduce the seriousness and duration of the virus.

Eliminate Airborne Viruses with a Medical Grade HEPA Air Purifier – Both flu and the common cold are spread by airborne viruses. That is why the flu can cut such a broad swath through families and communities so quickly. Using a high efficiency particle arresting (or HEPA) air purifier will reduce airborne viruses and bacteria as small as .3 microns from the air.

And even though some viruses are smaller than .3 microns, they tend to travel by attaching to normal household pollutants that are airborne such as dust, mold and mildew spores, pollen, dust mites, and pet dander.

Removing airborne pollutants that viruses can attach to means your baby’s air is healthier. And breathing clean air has been shown to greatly increase infant health and reduce the risk of flu.