Preparing for Baby: Home Safety Tips for Baby’s Healthy Start

Preparing for a baby is so exciting! But while you wait for that moment when labor begins, there are so many details to get your home ready. Some essential home safety tips are obvious, some are usually overlooked.

Home Safety Tips for a Healthy Baby

Sleeping Safety: Make sure the bed is safe. The mattress needs to be firm and fit the crib tightly. Although we love all the cute cuddly toys, pillows, bumper pads, comforters and the like they aren’t safe for a new baby. The baby can get trapped in the folds and be unable to breathe.

Diapering Safety: You’ll be amazed by how fast a tiny baby can roll away. It can take just a second as you reach for something. If you use a changing table make sure it has straps, and use them.

Bath Time Safety: Serious accidents happen in bathtubs. A special baby bathtub that offers baby support and a no-slip bottom is the best plan. If you plan to bathe your baby in your own tub, use a rubber mat. When she is big enough to sit up, you can use a baby bath chair. Be sure to set your water heater no higher than 120 degrees F and look for special tub spouts that prevent hot water burns. Also, keep everything you need in easy reach.

Fire Safety: Smoke detectors are a must. Keep them in working order and check them monthly. Also, have a fire extinguisher on hand. Make a plan for rescue and escape, if a fire does break out.

Carbon Monoxide Safety: If you use gas or oil heat or have an attached garage, be sure to install carbon monoxide (CO) detectors in your home. Check the batteries twice a year.

Paint Safety for Baby’s Room: If you’re in an older home attend to paint that’s flaking or peeling in your baby’s room. Have a professional remove or seal it. There may be dangerous lead in the paint. If you wish to freshly paint your baby’s room be aware of the chemicals that fresh paint can release into the air. Have someone (other than the expectant mom) paint your baby’s room at least a few weeks prior to your baby’s arrival and make sure to thoroughly ventilate the room, so the air quality is safe.

New Carpeting: New carpets are great, but they can out-gas for at least a month. As with fresh paint, if you plan to lay new carpet in your baby’s room, do it in time for the out-gassing phase to be over by the time baby comes home. Also, be sure to use non-slip pads under any area rugs you use in the room.

EMF Exposure Safety

Avoiding exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) is unavoidable. EMFs are generated from your home electrical grid and all wireless devices, like cell phones, cordless phones, Wi-Fi and baby monitors. Babies and little children are especially sensitive and since EMFs are linked to many childhood health problems, you need to use EMF protection in your home safety plan as you’re preparing for your baby. There are a number of products on the market for this. Look for a company that has a good history, guarantee and well-informed customer service.

Preparing for a baby can be a lot of fun. Follow these few home safety tips and then relax and anticipate the joyful arrival of your new baby.

Healthy Food For A Good Night’s Sleep!

Sleeping is essential for our health, for both baby and parents. Lets face it – when she or he sleeps well and for a long time, we also have a good night’s rest. From my experience with my little girl, the best food that promotes a good night sleep is something that has a low GI, (Glycemic Index) as the last meal of the day.

The best food to give to your baby at around 6 months, would be something that fills her up so she dose not wake up hungry in the middle of the night.

For dinner, I give my Olivia meals such as sweet potato mixed with rice cereal and some home made fruit jelly for dessert. The jelly is made with fresh fruit juice such as apple juice. Some cottage cheese with a bit of avocado mashed together is also great and filling. A few whole meal noodles she can hold in her hand, as she does like to feed herself, seems to be a favourite. Yoghurt, some grated fresh apple, mashed banana, carrot and potato mash are also suggested to keep your baby healthy and well feed. I usually choose 2 different dishes for any meal time. Porridge is a food she likes anytime of the day, it is warm and filling especially as the last thing at night.

In our house we are very big on vegetables. We try to live by the 2 x fruit and 5 x vegetables per day rule.

At first, when I gave Olivia a lot of vegetables in the evenings, I found she was dirtying her nappy through the night. I had to keep checking her nappies, as a dirty nappy irritated her skin when it was left on for a long time. This did not promote sleep for either of us!

I also found that if I gave her citrus fruits she developed nappy rash. From this I learned to feed her the bulk of the fruit and vegetables early in the day.

Her diet is now has the following structure:

o Fruit for breakfast and morning tea

o Vegetables for lunch and as a snack during the day.

o Carbohydrates, protein and dairy foods at night.

This seems to produce dirty nappies in the day which is fine – much quicker and easier to deal with than in the middle of the night! Oli has lots of wet nappies during the day and less leaky nappies at night. She has stopped waking up crying in the wee morning hours because she was all wet. A better night sleep thus results for all of us!

This type of eating may seem a bit strange, with the heaviest meals at breakfast and lunch, but it is the type of diet pattern followed in Europe, where I am originally from. The
pattern of a biggish breakfast, a main meal at lunch with lots of vegetables, and a light, but filling evening meal, with lots of carbohydrates, protein and dairy foods may suit your baby’s growing and developing needs very well.

Proper Ways To Sterilise Baby Bottles

Sterilizing your baby bottles is easy to do, and is a critical part of keeping your baby healthy.

Even a new package of bottles should be sterilized before you use them. Bacteria can rapidly grow on the surface and inside of the bottle, especially if the water used in feeding the baby is from a well or cistern.

There are different ways to sterilize your baby bottles; the most common is boiling. First, wash the bottles in hot, soapy water, rinsing well afterward. Place a pot of water on the stove or other heat source and bring it to a boil. Drop all parts of the bottles – nipples, rings, bottles, and caps – into the water and let them boil for at least ten minutes. With a set of tongs, pull the items out of the water and set them on a towel or dish rack to dry. A disadvantage to sterilizing in this way is that the nipples will need replaced often; they will become sticky after a few boils.

A steam sterilizer can also be used on the bottles. Place the steamer on a flat surface and fill it with water as directed by the manufacturer and turn it on. Once the steam begins, place the bottles on the rack as instructed.

Tablets are available for a method called cold sterilization. Dissolve the tablets in a pot of cold water, then drop the bottle parts in. After 30 minutes, dry the parts and they will be ready for use.

Special fixtures for microwaves can be purchased, allowing you to use it for sterilization. Make sure that your bottles are safe to use in the microwave and that your microwave is thoroughly clean before using this method. Any foods and strong smells inside will penetrate the material of the nipples and can upset the delicate stomach of a baby.

Using these methods to sterilize your baby bottles will help support the weak immune system of your baby and keep them healthy.